Grow Chlorophytum comosum (Spider Plant) to purify the air!

Chlorophytum comosum (Spider Plant) –

A young potted Chlorophytum comosum 'Vittatum' (Variegated Spider Plant) at our main door, shot Dec 11, 2007 Tiny starry flowers (1.5cm) of Chlorophytum Comosum 'Vittatum' (Variegated Spider Plant, Air Plant) in our garden
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Portulaca grandiflora, a sun-loving annual succulent!

Portulaca grandiflora (Moss Rose, Rose Moss, Sun Plant) –

Portulaca grandiflora - a deep pink variety Portulaca grandiflora - a white variety Portulaca grandiflora - a light pink variety
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Christmas Plant in our garden – December 2007

Mussaenda erythrophylla 'Ashanti Blood' with its Christmas colors of red and green, shines above the others in our garden Just have to share this stunning plant!

It is illuminating our whole tropical garden, especially during this time of the year, the wonderful Season of Advent and Christmas!

It is none other than the beautiful Mussaenda erythrophylla ‘Ashanti Blood’ which displays vividly the vibrant colors of Christmas – red and green!

Absolutely striking! :D
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Christmas Greetings 2007

Christmas countdown – only 3 more days left!

As we prepare to receive Jesus coming into our hearts this Christmas, let’s take these last few days of Advent to find time to rest in God’s constant love and faithfulness and thank Him for all His wondrous blessings, guidance and protection, especially having filled our lives with family and friends.
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Attacus atlas, the largest moth in the world!

Attacus atlas (Atlas Moth)

Giant moth (Attacus atlas) resting on net at our backyard Yay, I have finally unravelled the identify of this stunning beauty!

How wonderful to be able to name it after almost 4 years since it was last sighted at our backyard in January 24, 2004. And, to know that this was a handsome male moth and learn so much more about it. Sad though, to read that an adult Atlas moth can live only for about two weeks. They do not eat at all throughout their adult life, do not even have mouths and live off fat reserves built up when they were caterpillars. They quickly mate, lay eggs, and die shortly thereafter.
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